Pupil premium

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement

The Pupil Premium Grant (PPG) is additional funding provided to schools to narrow the gap of attainment for some pupils. These children are from low income families who are currently known to be or have been eligible for free school meals in the last six years. It also supports children who have been 'looked after' continuously for more than six months or who have been adopted from care.

Whitegrove Primary School is fully committed to supporting pupils for whom the pupil premium provides support. At Whitegrove, our purpose in using pupil premium funding is to ensure that all the unique needs of our pupils are met and our children thrive and achieve the same high academic success and have access to all our enrichment activities. Our main focus is to improve the quality of teaching for all children, no matter their background, and to provide quality teaching for individuals and groups as required. No child should feel singled out due to the low number of PP children in our care but should grow in confidence, self-esteem and achieve their very best.

At Whitegrove we:

  • Recognise the fact that pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium are not an homogeneous group and cover a wide range of needs. As such the strategies we use to raise attainment will take these group and individual needs fully into account.
  • Use high quality teaching and learning as the preferred way to narrow the gaps in attainment in the first instance. We will also use high quality interventions with proven evidence of impact to assist our pupils who need additional support in a time limited way.

 

Strategic Plan for Pupil Premium Spending 2018-2019

In 2018-19, Whitegrove Primary School expects to receive £24,660 in pupil premium funding to provide additional academic and pastoral support for 4.0% of our school population.

Barriers to educational achievement What? Why? Success criteria used to measure impact of funding

Low self-esteem and poor self-image, leading to low expectations and a lack of aspiration.

 

Low self-confidence and emotional resilience.

 

Vulnerable children are not ‘ready’ enough for learning.

 

Writing skills for less able PP children and those with SEN are not yet good enough to support learning across the curriculum.

 

 

a)      Further embed the ‘Growth Mindset’ programme complementing and building upon our existing work on the 6Rs – our values for learning.

Research collated by the Educational Endowment Foundation (EEF) indicates that developing children’s meta-cognition and self-regulation have consistently high impact.

PP children can become more independent when they take greater responsibility for their own learning.

Children articulate that they are thinking about their own learning explicitly – planning, monitoring and evaluating their own learning. Children express that they are better able to manage their own motivation towards learning. 

b)      Continue work of Social Emotional HLTA in working with vulnerable children and their families.
LSAs deliver Emotional Literacy support interventions.

Develop the social emotional work of our Outdoor Learning LSAs supporting vulnerable children.

c)       Continue providing additional LSA support at breaks and lunchtimes.

d)      Develop children’s awareness of the need for online safety.

Social emotional programmes have been effective in the last couple of years in building children’s resilience. Greater resilience supports children to persevere and problem solve in their learning. The EEF Toolkit endorses positive impact of Social Emotional interventions.

Children are more resilient in their social relationships and attitudes so that they are ‘ready’ for learning.

Vulnerable children are socially indistinguishable from their peers within their classes.

Parents are engaged and empowered.

e)      High expectations and high-quality teaching, particularly in writing and maths, deepening the learning for all children.

f)       Lessons are ‘tilted’ so that PP children are a priority focus for challenge, support and feedback.

All children should receive high quality teaching. ‘Tilting’ ensures that PP children are a focus for all learning opportunities. The Sutton Trust (2011) found that good teachers are especially important for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds.

 

Performance review process supports the needs of vulnerable children.

PP children achieve age-related expectations of better in reading, writing and maths. Those ‘doubly disadvantaged’ make expected or better progress in all areas towards their targets.

g)      Promote fluent written transcription skills by encouraging extensive and effective practice and explicitly teaching spelling.

h)      Teach writing composition strategies through modelling and supported practice.

i)        Use tracking data and individual evaluations of the needs of PP children to target strategies and interventions to meet their needs.

j)        Monitor impact and cost-benefit through provision mapping and progress meetings.

The EEF reports Improving Literacy at KS1 (2016) and Improving Literacy at KS2 (2017) both cite the need to extensively rehearse transcription skills. Similarly, they say that children need to explicitly learn the process of composing writing and have a clear purpose and genuine audience.

 

 

All PP children make accelerated progress in writing compared to their year group.

Attainment in writing improves as a result of improved skills and confidence in composition.

The next pupil premium strategy review will be in September 2019.

Strategic Plan for Pupil Premium Spending 2017-2018

In 2017-18, Whitegrove Primary School expects to receive £23,460 in pupil premium funding to provide additional academic and pastoral support for 4.0% of our school population.

 

Barriers to educational achievement What? Why? Success criteria used to measure impact of funding

Low self-esteem and poor self-image, leading to low expectations and a  lack of aspiration.

 

Low self-confidence and emotional resilience.

 

Vulnerable children are not ‘ready’ enough for learning.

 

Reading comprehension skills  for less able PP children are not yet good enough to support learning across the curriculum.

 

Implement a ‘Growth Mindset’ programme to complement and build upon our existing work on the 6Rs – our values for learning.

Research collated by the Educational Endowment Foundation (EEF) indicates that developing children’s meta-cognition and self-regulation have consistently high impact.

Children think about their own learning more explicitly – planning, monitoring and evaluating their own learning. Children express that they are better able to manage their own motivation towards learning. 

Continue work of Social Emotional HLTA in working with vulnerable children and their families.
LSAs to be trained and to deliver Emotional Literacy support interventions.

Continue Garden Apprentice programme and extra LSA support at breaks and lunchtimes.
Social emotional programmes have been effective this year in building children’s resilience. EEF Toolkit endorses positive impact of Social emotional interventions.

Children are more resilient in their social relationships and attitudes so that they are ‘ready’ for learning.

Parents are engaged and empowered.

High expectations and high-quality teaching, particularly in writing and maths, deepening the learning for all children.

Lessons are ‘tilted’ so that PP children are a priority focus for challenge, support and feedback.

CPD on effective feedback approaches for all teachers.

The Sutton Trust (2011) found that good teachers are especially important for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The EEF Toolkit shows that effective feedback has a very positive impact on learners.

Improving outcomes for PP children is a whole school priority.

Accelerated progress for PP children leads to improved proportions achieving beyond the expected standards.

Use pre-teaching of texts to support whole-class reading and to build vocabulary.

Use of guided reading strategies to build reading comprehension skills.

Use tracking data and individual evaluations of the needs of PP children to target strategies and interventions to meet their needs.

Monitor impact and cost-benefit through provision mapping and progress meetings.

EEF Toolkit shows good impact of reading and reading comprehension interventions on outcomes for PPG children.

PP children make accelerated progress in reading compared to their year group.

Attainment in writing and maths improve as a result of improved reading confidence.

The school has continued to embrace the concept of ‘tilt’ focusing aspects of the school’s work on PP and other vulnerable children, and how it will impact them. These include staff meetings, staff training, learning time with children (including marking and feedback focus), resource considerations and new initiatives.
‘Tilt’ means that all staff are aware of and consider PP children and are involved in their provision.

KS2 2016 Attainment and Progress 2018

Pupils eligible for PP (Whitegrove)

Pupils not eligible for PP (national average)

Percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard or above in reading

50%

80%

Percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard or above in writing

50%

83%

Percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard or above in mathematics

50%

81%

Percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard or above in reading, writing and mathematics

50%

70%

Average progress in reading

0.09

0.0

Average progress in writing

-2.01

0.0

Average progress in mathematics

0.91

0.0

Average scaled score in reading and mathematics

102

105.7

 

Internal monitoring of teacher assessment data across the school shows that 94% of PP children made good or better progress over the year in reading, with 13% of these making accelerated progress. 69% of PP children made good or better progress over the year in writing with 31% making accelerated progress and 89% of PP children made good or better progress over the year in maths with 38% making accelerated progress.

a)
All teachers and most LSAs were trained in aspects of ‘Growth Mindset’ in Summer 2017. Following this all classes were introduced to ‘Growth Mindset’ using the ELSA materials and displays were created for each class as reminders. Teachers used tilting strategies to ensure that all PP children were fully engaged with this work.
Evidence from learning walks shows that the teachers and LSAs are using the language and concepts of ‘Growth Mindset’ in lessons across the curriculum, together with continuing to refer to our 6R’s. When discussing learning with their peers, children are using the language of Growth Mindset and remind each other when they say “I can’t.” to say “I can’t yet.” The school’s STEP partner reported that “The impact of this work can be observed within lessons, the culture of the school and on pupil outcomes in July 2018.“

b) and c)

LSAs have been trained in usingemotional literacy support (ELSA)materials with groups of children, bringing fresh ideas and strategies to support vulnerable children. Further resources focusing on attachment and social communication have been purchased.Our Garden Apprentice programme continued to support social skills and basic numeracy and literacy skills in a motivating and hands-on environment. The guinea pigs continue to support children who are not ready for learning through spending 10-15 minutes stroking and feeding the guinea pigs, before returning to class in a much calmer state. The HLTA has supported individual vulnerable children and their families across the school with social, emotional, mental health issues.
Evidence from learning walks showedimproved engagement formost vulnerable children with their learning.The evidence from assessment data supports this. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires undertaken for the ELSA interventions showed improved self-confidence and self-esteem for most, including PPG children. Parental attendance at school meetings for vulnerable children hasincreased slightly.


d), e) and f)
Teachers undertook training on ‘The pedagogy of engagement and responsiveness’ with Dylan William. These strategies supported our ‘tilting’ for vulnerable children.As part of the School Development Plan, there has been a continuedwhole school focus on ‘room at the top’ for all and curriculum development to support this. Disadvantaged children have been a key focus of all staff training on this. Another whole school focus was on further developing children’s writing skills, giving children strategies to achieve high standards in their writing. Child-friendly writing criteriawere developed for each year groups and these have supported children to identify independently the areas which they want to focus on and include in their writing, as well as better enabling them to better understand their teacher’s detailed feedback.
Small group and individual interventions in aspects of reading, spelling, writing and maths continue for PP children where learning gaps were identified.

Evidence from learning walks showed effective feedback strategies and tilting strategies in action within classrooms, with improved engagement in learning for vulnerable children. The evidence from the assessment data supports this. Analysis of impact of provision for PP children showed good impact (2.08) for ‘prioritising’ tilting strategies.

 g), h), i) and j)

Reading interventions including pre-teaching of texts were used across school to support readers in accessing whole-class reading books and other reading materials. This enabled children to access specific vocabulary in lessons, thereby enabling them to respond more effectively to comprehension questions and participate in discussions.Small group guided reading interventions have continued. PP children are supported and encouraged to choose engaging reading materials, to support building their vocabulary, comprehension and range of interests. Opportunities and encouragement to read in school as well as a home have continued.
The attainments of children in receipt of PPG and other vulnerable pupils are tracked termly using DETracker and analysed by the Deputy Head. Similarly, the impact of provisions made for PPG children is collected and analysed termly.Provision mapping has enabled improved matching of children’s needs to the interventions made and tracking the impact of this. Cost analysis for reading provisions show a very positive cost/impact for PP children.

Evidence from analysis of impact of provision for reading interventions showed better than good impact (2.36). This is supported by the assessment data for reading. Further reading support is necessary where children are double-disadvantaged (PP & SEN).

Breakdown of Pupil Premium Grant Spending 2017 - 2018

Social, emotional and pastoral support

 £      10,479

Extra TA playtime support

 £         1,978

Additional reading provision

 £         2,267

Additional maths provision

 £         1,819

1:1 teaching

 £         1,320

Additional writing provision

 £         2,845

Communication / vocabulary support

 £         1,257

Home learning support

 £            763

Trips / resources / extra-curricular support

 £            571

Training

 £            735

 

 

Total spend 2017 – 2018

 £      24,034